Name: 
 

The Civil War



Matching
 
 
Match each item with the correct statement below.
a.
sectionalism
f.
Preston Brooks
b.
Republican Party
g.
Sojourner Truth
c.
abolitionists
h.
South Carolina
d.
John Brown
i.
Compromise of 1850
e.
Kansas-Nebraska Act
j.
Abraham Lincoln
 

 1. 

new party formed on an antislavery platform in 1854
 

 2. 

proslavery Representative who brutally attacked an antislavery Senator
 

 3. 

a strong allegiance to a particular region of the country
 

 4. 

stated in his First Inaugural Address that Southern states would not be allowed to secede
 

 5. 

escaped from slavery and dedicated herself to the abolitionist and women’s rights movements
 

 6. 

voted to secede from the United States after the election of 1860
 

 7. 

allowed settlers of Kansas and Nebraska to vote on whether to allow slavery
 

 8. 

five-point plan presented by Henry Clay and passed as separate proposals
 

 9. 

people who worked to bring an end to slavery
 

 10. 

led a raid on Harpers Ferry, Virginia
 
 
Match each item with the correct statement below.
a.
Uncle Tom’s Cabin
f.
Abraham Lincoln
b.
Free-Soil Party
g.
American Slavery As It Is
c.
Confederate States of America
h.
Fort Sumter
d.
Dred Scott Decision
i.
Kansas-Nebraska Act
e.
The Liberator
j.
Missouri Compromise
 

 11. 

formed in 1861 by states that had seceded
 

 12. 

led to violent confrontations between antislavery and proslavery forces in Kansas
 

 13. 

Supreme Court ruled Congress could not ban slavery in any territories
 

 14. 

influential antislavery publication written by Angelina Grimké and Theodore Weld
 

 15. 

popular antislavery novel written by Harriet Beecher Stowe
 

 16. 

formed when presidential candidates in 1848 election took no stand on slavery in the territories
 

 17. 

newspaper founded by William Lloyd Garrison that called for immediate emancipation for slaves
 

 18. 

earned a national reputation through a series of seven debates
 

 19. 

retained balance between slave and free states
 

 20. 

attacked by Confederate forces to start the Civil War
 

Multiple Choice
Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question.
 

 21. 

The American Colonization Society aimed to
a.
keep territories from allowing slavery.
b.
start religious revivals.
c.
gradually abolish slavery.
d.
emancipate all slaves immediately.
 

 22. 

The Grimké sisters from South Carolina
a.
supported the gradual abolition of slavery.
b.
freed their slaves.
c.
supported slavery.
d.
wrote Uncle Tom’s Cabin.
 

 23. 

The Missouri Compromise passed because
a.
the raid on Harpers Ferry frightened both Northerners and Southerners.
b.
the Republican Party supported it.
c.
it did not upset the balance between slave and free states in Congress.
d.
all of the above
 

 24. 

The effect of protective tariffs was to
a.
raise the price of cotton. imports.
c.
harm local industry.
b.
raise the price of local goods.
d.
raise the price of imports.
 

 25. 

Which area of the country most strongly supported war with Mexico?
a.
the North
c.
the East
b.
the South
d.
settlers in Oregon country
 

 26. 

The phrase “Bleeding Kansas” referred to
a.
violence between pro- and antislavery advocates in Kansas.
b.
the location of many Civil War battles in the state.
c.
the assault on Charles Sumner by Preston Brooks.
d.
the color of the river waters in the state.
 

 27. 

How did the Dred Scott decision regulate the spread of slavery?
a.
It restricted it to states where it already existed.
b.
It removed all restrictions on its spread.
c.
It abolished the slave trade.
d.
It abolished slavery altogether.
 

 28. 

Stephen Douglas supported
a.
gradual emancipation.
b.
restricting the spread of slavery.
c.
protecting slaveholders’ rights.
d.
popular sovereignty.
 

 29. 

Why did Southern states feel justified in seceding?
a.
They believed the federal government would not allow slavery in the South to continue.
b.
They viewed the Constitution as a contract between states.
c.
The North refused to enforce the Fugitive Slave Act.
d.
All of the above
 

 30. 

Where were the first shots of the Civil War fired?
a.
the Alamo
c.
on the Mason-Dixon Line
b.
Washington, D.C.
d.
Fort Sumter, South Carolina
 
 
nar001-1.jpg
 

 31. 

mc031-1.jpg When did John Rankin begin helping slaves escape on the Underground Railroad?
a.
1820
c.
1830
b.
1822
d.
1839
 

 32. 

mc032-1.jpg Why was Harriet Tubman called the “Moses of her people”?
a.
She was deeply religious.
c.
She escaped from slavery in 1849.
b.
She had converted to Christianity.
d.
She led many slaves to freedom.
 

 33. 

mc033-1.jpg What impact did the Fugitive Slave Act of 1850 have on the Underground Railroad?
a.
The Underground Railroad became weaker.
b.
It strengthened people’s resolve to help slaves.
c.
Its conductors were all arrested.
d.
It forced Northerners to return escaped slaves.
 
 
We are a band of brothers,
And native to the soil,
Fighting for the property
We gained by honest toil;
And when our rights were threatened,
The cry rose near and far:
“Hurrah for the Bonny Blue Flag
That bears a single star!”
Hurrah! hurrah! For Southern rights, hurrah!
Hurrah for the Bonny Blue Flag,
That bears a single star!
—Confederate song, “The Bonny Blue Flag”
 

 34. 

mc034-1.jpg Why did Southerners feel justified in seceding from the union?
a.
The slave trade had ended.
b.
They hated Abraham Lincoln.
c.
Their property rights were threatened.
d.
Northerners had asked them to secede.
 

 35. 

mc035-1.jpg What was the property that Southerners felt the North had threatened?
a.
their plantations
c.
their claim to the territories
b.
fertile farmland
d.
their slaves
 

 36. 

mc036-1.jpg The Bonny Blue Flag served as a symbol of
a.
Jefferson Davis.
c.
the Civil War.
b.
the Confederate cause.
d.
the Union.
 

 37. 

What reinvigorated the antislavery movement after 1830?
a.
increasing dependence on slaves in the Deep South
b.
religious revivals and reform movements
c.
the failure of the gradual approach to ending slavery
d.
all of the above
 

 38. 

Who was Frederick Douglass?
a.
a conductor on the Underground Railroad
b.
an escaped slave and abolitionist
c.
editor of The Liberator
d.
leader of a slave revolt
 

 39. 

How did Americans resist the Fugitive Slave Act of 1850?
a.
by working on the Underground Railroad
b.
by serving on juries that refused to convict people who broke the law
c.
by following and announcing the presence of slave hunters
d.
all of the above
 

 40. 

How did the Compromise of 1850 affect the New Mexico Territory?
a.
New Mexico had no slavery restrictions.
b.
New Mexico won a border dispute with Texas.
c.
New Mexico would be admitted to the Union as a free state.
d.
Both A and B
 

 41. 

The nullification controversies of the early Republic were essentially struggles over
a.
the power of state governments vs. the power of the federal government.
b.
whether slavery would be legal in the territories.
c.
whether the federal government could declare war.
d.
how many political parties the new nation would have.
 

 42. 

Why did Stephen Douglas propose abandoning the Missouri Compromise?
a.
He was a strong supporter of slavery.
b.
He wanted to encourage westward expansion.
c.
His reelection depended on it.
d.
both A and C
 

 43. 

Who was the first Republican candidate for president?
a.
Abraham Lincoln
c.
John Brown
b.
John C. Frémont
d.
Henry Clay
 

 44. 

What did John Brown believe would end slavery?
a.
peaceful negotiations
c.
conscientious objection
b.
armed rebellions
d.
nonviolent resistance
 

 45. 

Who did Republicans nominate for president in 1860?
a.
Abraham Lincoln
c.
Dred Scott
b.
Henry Clay
d.
Stephen Douglas
 

 46. 

In his First Inaugural Address, Abraham Lincoln said that
a.
slavery would be abolished.
c.
the country was at war.
b.
secession would not be allowed.
d.
owning slaves was immoral.
 
 
nar003-1.jpg
 

 47. 

mc047-1.jpg Which states seceded from the Union before the attack on Fort Sumter?
a.
mostly states in the Deep South
c.
all slaveholding states
b.
mostly states in the Upper South
d.
all of the above
 

 48. 

mc048-1.jpg Which states remained in the Union?
a.
only free states
c.
several slaveholding border states
b.
all free states
d.
both b and c
 

 49. 

mc049-1.jpg When the Confederate government received Lincoln’s message that he was sending supplies to Fort Sumter, the Confederates
a.
attacked the expedition.
b.
attacked the fort before supplies arrived.
c.
let the expedition into the fort.
d.
demanded the fort’s surrender.
 
 
CAUTION!!
COLORED PEOPLE
OF BOSTON, ONE & ALL
You are hereby respectfully CAUTIONED and
advised, to avoid conversing with the
Watchmen and Police Officers
of Boston,

For since the recent ORDER OF THE MAYOR &
ALDERMEN, they are empowered to act as
KIDNAPPERS
AND
Slave Catchers,
And they have already been actually employed in KIDNAPPING, CATCHING AND KEEPING SLAVES. Therefore, if you value your LIBERTY, and the Welfare of the Fugitives among you, Shun them in every possible manner, as so many HOUNDS on the track of the most unfortunate of your race.
Keep a Sharp Look Out for KIDNAPPERS, and have TOP EYE open.
APRIL 24, 1851. Theodore Parker’s placard.
—1851
 

 50. 

mc050-1.jpg The poster urged African Americans to avoid
a.
watchmen and police officers.
c.
plantation owners.
b.
escaped slaves.
d.
talking with one another.
 

 51. 

mc051-1.jpg Who do you think wrote this poster?
a.
Southern slaveholders
c.
escaped slaves
b.
federal officials
d.
antislavery activists
 

 52. 

mc052-1.jpg What were the Northerners resisting?
a.
the Underground Railroad
c.
the Missouri Compromise
b.
the Fugitive Slave Act
d.
the Compromise of 1850
 
 
nar005-1.jpg
 

 53. 

mc053-1.jpg In 1821, Missouri was _____?
a.
a slave state
c.
a free territory
b.
a slave territory
d.
a free state
 
 
“. . . If, then, we persist in war, which, if it terminates in anything short of a mere wanton waste of blood as well as money, must end (as this bill proposes) in the acquisition of territory, to which at once this controversy must attach—this bill would seem to be nothing less than a bill to produce internal commotion. Should we prosecute this war another moment, or expend one dollar in the purchase or conquest of a single acre of Mexican land, the North and the South are brought into collision on a point where neither will yield.”
–Senator Thomas Corwin (Ohio), speech in the Senate, February 11, 1847
 

 54. 

mc054-1.jpg What is the “controversy” that Senator Corwin mentions in this passage?
a.
the question of the extension of slavery into any new territories acquired
b.
whether the national government can impose tariffs in any new territories
c.
how many Senators and Representatives each new territory would have
d.
where to move any Native Americans living in new territories
 
 
“I am aware, that many object to the severity of my language; but is there not cause for severity? I will be as harsh as truth, and as uncompromising as justice. On this subject, I do not wish to think, or speak, or write, with moderation. No! no! Tell a man whose house is on fire to give a moderate alarm . . . [U]rge me not to use moderation in a cause like the present. I am in earnest—I will not equivocate—I will not excuse—I will not retreat a single inch—AND I WILL BE HEARD. . .”
–William Lloyd Garrison, The Liberator, 1831
 

 55. 

mc055-1.jpg In this passage, Garrison is describing his passion for justice on which issue?
a.
child labor
c.
abolition of slavery
b.
women’s rights
d.
educational reform
 
 
“I was born a slave in Ulster County, New York. . . . _____ is my name because from this day I will walk in the light of [God’s] truth.”
 

 56. 

mc056-1.jpg This famous worker for women’s rights and the abolition of slavery lived as a slave in the cellar of a slaveholder’s house. She escaped in 1826. Which is the name she chose for herself that fills in the blank of this quotation?
a.
Isabella Baumfree
c.
Sarah Lovejoy
b.
Angelina Bright
d.
Sojourner Truth
 
 
“America is more our country than it is the whites’—we have enriched it with our blood and tears.”
–David Walker
 

 57. 

mc057-1.jpg As a leading writer, with which group of abolitionists did Walker play a major role?
a.
Native Americans
c.
radical Southern whites
b.
free African Americans
d.
New England transcendentalists
 
 
“What, to the American slave, is your Fourth of July? . . . To him, your celebration is a sham; your boasted liberty, an unholy license; your national greatness, swelling vanity; your sounds of rejoicing are empty and heartless; your denunciation of tyrants, brass-fronted impudence; your shouts of liberty and equality, hollow mockery; your prayers and hymns, your sermons and thanksgivings, with all your religious parade and solemnity, are, to Him, mere bombast, fraud, deception, impiety, and hypocrisy—a thin veil to cover up crimes which would disgrace a nation of savages. There is not a nation of savages. There is not a nation on the earth guilty of practices more shocking and bloody than are the people of the United States at this very hour.”
–Frederick Douglass, Independence Day Speech, Rochester, New York (1841)
 

 58. 

mc058-1.jpg The statement that best interprets this passage is _____.
a.
America should be a symbol of liberty.
b.
The injustice of slavery destroys America’s ideals of freedom.
c.
America is great but not perfect.
d.
America’s tolerance of diversity is wonderful.
 
 
“The existence of slavery impairs the industry and the power of a nation; and it does so in proportion to the multiplication of its slaves . . .
“If slavery be permitted in Missouri, with the climate and soil and in the circumstances of this territory, what hope can be entertained that it will ever be prohibited in any of the new states that will be formed in the immense region west of the Mississippi?”
–Senator Rufus King, Nile’s Weekly Register, December 4, 1819

“Rob us of our just portion of the territory which has been jointly purchased by the treasures of the nation and the valley of the Mississippi will be settled by the sons of the Eastern people, the inheritors of their fathers' prejudices . . .
     “And when they have succeeded in excluding from the Western settlements every Southern man, and shall have sent forth in every direction swarms from the Northern hive, and missionary preachers against the cruelties and inhumanities of Southern slavery, a universal emancipation may be the next scheme suggested by visionary philanthropists or promoted by designing politicians.”
–Anonymous, Richmond Enquirer, December 23, 1819
 

 59. 

mc059-1.jpg Compare the two statements and decide which issue in the region west of the Mississippi most concerns both these two individuals.
a.
the settlement by northerners
b.
the prohibition of slavery
c.
the exclusion of southerners
d.
the weakening of the national economy
 
 
“I have favored this Missouri Compromise, believing it to be all that could be effected under the present Constitution, and from extreme unwillingness to put the Union at hazard. But perhaps it would have been a wiser as well as a bolder course to have persisted in the restriction upon Missouri, till it should have terminated in a convention of the states to revise and amend the Constitution. This would have produced a new Union of thirteen or fourteen States, unpolluted with slavery, . . . . If the Union must be dissolved, slavery is precisely the question upon which it ought to break. . . .”
–John Quincy Adams, March 3, 1820
 

 60. 

mc060-1.jpg In his diary entry, John Quincy Adams describes which alternate solution to the issues dealt with in the Missouri Compromise?
a.
the universal emancipation of slaves
b.
a constitutional amendment prohibiting slavery
c.
a national vote by citizens on the slavery issue
d.
the spread of the factory system in the South
 
 
“Upon these considerations, it is the opinion of the court that the Act of Congress [the Missouri Compromise] which prohibited a citizen from holding and owning property of this kind in the territory of the United States north of the line therein mentioned, is not warranted by the Constitution, and is therefore void; and that neither Dred Scott himself, nor any of his family, were made free by being carried into this territory; even if they had been carried there by the owner, with the intention of becoming a permanent resident. . . .”
–Chief Justice Roger B. Taney, decision on Dred Scott v. Sandford, March 6, 1857
 

 61. 

mc061-1.jpg Many Southerners were pleased by this decision because it said _____.
a.
Dred Scott now would be freed
b.
slavery was unconstitutional
c.
restricting slavery was unconstitutional
d.
slaves were not property
 
 
“. . . Can the people of a territory in any lawful way, against the wishes of any citizen of the United States, exclude slavery from their limits prior to the formation of a state constitution? . . . [T]he people have the lawful means to introduce it or exclude it as they please, for the reason that slavery cannot exist a day or an hour anywhere unless it is supported by local police regulations. Those police regulations can only be established by the local legislature, and, if the people are opposed to slavery, they will elect representatives to that body who will by unfriendly legislation effectually prevent the introduction of it into their midst. . . .”
–Stephen A. Douglas, Lincoln–Douglas debate, August 27, 1858
 

 62. 

mc062-1.jpg In this passage, the position Douglas states became known as the _____.
a.
Douglas Decree
c.
Freeport Doctrine
b.
Jonesboro Statement
d.
Clay Compromise
 
 
“[The real issue is] between the men who think slavery a wrong and those who do not think it wrong. The Republican Party thinks it wrong.”
–Abraham Lincoln, Lincoln–Douglas Debates, 1858
 

 63. 

mc063-1.jpg After the Lincoln–Douglas Debates, who won the election to the seat of U.S. Senator from Illinois?
a.
Abraham Lincoln
c.
Henry Clay
b.
Stephen A. Douglas
d.
Daniel Webster
 
 
“As a necessity, not a choice, we have resorted to the remedy of separation, and henceforth our energies must be directed to the conduct of our own affairs, . . . If a just perception of mutual interest shall permit us peaceably to pursue our separate political career my most earnest desire will have been fulfilled. But if this be denied to us . . . [we will be forced] to appeal to arms. . . .”
–February 18, 1861
 

 64. 

mc064-1.jpg This statement of separation is a quotation from _____.
a.
Abraham Lincoln’s Inaugural Address
b.
John Brown’s Harper’s Ferry speech
c.
Jefferson Davis’s Inaugural Address
d.
Robert E. Lee’s letter to his wife
 
 
“Physically speaking, we can not separate. We can not remove our respective sections from each other nor build an impassable wall between them. A husband and wife may be divorced and go out of the presence and beyond the reach of each other; but the different parts of our country can not do this. . . .
“In your hands, my dissatisfied fellow countrymen, and not in mine, is the momentous issue of civil war.”
–March 4, 1861
 

 65. 

mc065-1.jpg Who made this statement about secession?
a.
Abraham Lincoln
c.
John C. Calhoun
b.
Jefferson Davis
d.
Robert E. Lee
 
 
nar018-1.jpg
 

 66. 

mc066-1.jpg Based on the two maps, which of the following statements is correct?
a.
The Kansas-Nebraska Act of 1854 abolished slaveholding in United States territories.
b.
The Kansas-Nebraska Act of 1854 increased the amount of territory open to slaveholding in the United States.
c.
The Kansas-Nebraska Act of 1854 decreased the amount of territory open to slaveholding in the United States.
d.
The Kansas-Nebraska Act of 1854 increased the number of free states in the United States.
 

 67. 

mc067-1.jpg Based on the two maps, how did Oregon Territory change between 1850 and 1854?
a.
It became open to slaveholding.
b.
It became a free state.
c.
It doubled in size.
d.
Part of it was declared Washington Territory.
 
 
nar019-1.jpg
 

 68. 

mc068-1.jpg Based on the map, in 1860 Kentucky and West Virginia were both _____.
a.
Union free states
c.
Union territories
b.
slave states
d.
Union slave states
 

 69. 

mc069-1.jpg Based on the map, which of the following statements is correct?
a.
In 1861, the boundary between the Union and the Confederacy ran from Texas to Virginia.
b.
In 1861, the boundary between the Union and the Confederacy ran from Texas to New York.
c.
In 1861, the boundary between the Union and the Confederacy ran from Missouri to Delaware.
d.
In 1861, the boundary between the Union and the Confederacy ran from Maine to California.
 

Short Answer
 

 70. 

sa070-1.jpg
sa070-2.jpgStudy the time line. Under whose presidential administration was the Missouri Compromise passed?
 
 
“I looked at my hands to see if I was the same person now that I was free . . . I felt like I was in heaven.”
–Harriet Tubman, on her escape from slavery, 1849
 

 71. 

sa071-1.jpgIn this quotation, why does Tubman look at her hands?
 
 
“I would rather hear of natural blasts and mildews, war, pestilence, and famine, than to hear gentlemen talk of secession.”
–Daniel Webster, speech in Congress, 1850
 

 72. 

sa072-1.jpgWhy is the speaker of this excerpt supporting Henry Clay’s plan for compromise in the1850 congressional debate about new Western territories?
 
 
“ . . . [T]he two great divisions of society are not rich and poor, but white and black; and all the former, the poor as well as the rich, belong to the upper classes, and are respected and treated as such.”
–Senator John C. Calhoun of South Carolina
 

 73. 

sa073-1.jpgWhat kind of beliefs about race does Calhoun demonstrate in this quotation?
 

Essay
 

 74. 

What was the Compromise of 1850? Describe its five parts.
 

 75. 

Why did the Southern states feel secession was justified?
 



 
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